A brief introduction to Nutri-Genomics

Link between DNA and Nutrition aims to set new standard
in treatment of chronic conditions.

Medical experts and nutritionists continually encourage
people to eat more of certain food types to promote
general well-being and overall health. Emerging scientific
evidence shows that some foods can help to treat and
even prevent certain conditions - not only for humans but
for our pets as well.

NutriGenomics is a relatively new science that explores the
interplay between genetic make-up and how the nutrients
found in certain foods could assist in the prevention of
specific diseases.

The application of nutrigenomics allows scientists to
gain a better understanding of genetic disease. To date,
approximately 450 canine genetic diseases have been
identified, which vary according to breed.

NutriGenomics has great potential to improve the health
of our pets from disease prevention to, in some cases,
prolonging life expectancy.

The application of nutrigenomics through genetic research
marks the beginning of a new way forward in the treatment
of many chronic conditions, without the need for invasive
surgery or the side effects of drug therapy. It gives us
great insight into understanding how and why certain
canine breeds are predisposed to particular conditions
and gives us one more tool in our ongoing quest to treat
and prevent illness.

The progression from a healthy state to a disease state
occurs through changes in gene expression, which can
be affected through ingestion of dietary factors, and the
introduction of pet foods based on these findings is an
important step in helping to further explore the concept
of nutritional therapy in the treatment of debilitating canine
diseases.

For instance, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3
fatty acid found in high concentrations in fish oil has been
demonstrated to alter the action of a degenerative enzyme
that causes cartilage degradation.

Nutrigenomics looks set to transform pet nutrition therapy
as we know it. It is hoped that further exploration may one
day lead to the cessation of certain genetic diseases
in both the human and pet populations.
                                                                                            
                                                                  
November 2006
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